Baseball Athletic Skill Measurables

Student athletes need to meet particular skill levels to qualify to play. Our list of athletic skill measurables provides a baseline of the measurables D-I, D-II, D-III, NAIA, and Junior College coaches look for.

Division 1 Baseball:

  • RHP: 88-90+ MPH consistently with movement; command of at least 3 pitches; over 1K per inning pitched in HS
  • LHP: 86-87+ MPH consistently with movement; command of at least 3 pitches; 1K per inning pitched in HS
  • Catcher: 1.9 Pop Time or below; superior leadership skills and ability to call games
  • 1B/3B: Tremendous size and power potential (8 + HR in HS)
  • SS/2B: 6.8 60 yrd or below; 85+ MPH from INF to 1B, 1.35-1.40 turn time
  • CF: 6.7 60 yrd or below; 87+ MPH from OF

Division 2 Baseball:

  • RHP:  85+ MPH consistently with movement; command of at least 3 pitches; 1K per inning pitched in HS
  • LHP:  83+ MPH consistently with movement; command of at least 3 pitches; 1K per inning pitched in HS
  • Catcher: 2.0 Pop Time or Below; superior leadership skills and ability to call games
  • 1B/3B:  Tremendous Power Potential
  • SS/2B: 6.9 60 yrd or below; 82+ MPH from INF to 1B; 1.45 turn time
  • CF: 6.8 60 yrd or below; 82+ MPH from OF

Division 3 Baseball:

  • Division III baseball/softball are highly competitive, despite the fact that they do not offer athletic scholarships.  Some DIII programs are playing on a D2 level, and professional players have been drafted from DIII schools.  Due to the discrepancies between DIII schools, it is important that you research each program that you are interested in order to get a better idea as to what type of player they are looking for.

NAIA Baseball:

  • Like DIII schools, the discrepancies are far too wide to find any similarities in characteristics.  Be sure to fully research each individual program to get a better idea as to what type of player they are looking for.

Junior College Baseball:

  • Junior Colleges have 3 divisions for the purpose of separating stronger JC programs from the weaker ones.  While there may be somewhat of a drop off in talent between Division III Junior Colleges and Division 1 and Division II Junior Colleges, there is little difference between a DI and DII Junior College.  Many Junior College players lack the ‘polish’ to be considered D1 players coming out of high school, but they already possess the necessary physical tools to be successful at the D1 level.